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Seabags.com

Author: Rishi Rawat

10% discounts are everywhere. They are so pervasive most shoppers ignore them or yawn when they see them. Here is a discount offer on seabags.com:

Seabags.com popup message. 10% off.

So if shoppers are unimpressed by a 10% offer what is seabags.com to do? One idea is to give a bigger discount. That’s actually a terrible idea.

We have a better idea. What if we flipped the script?

While studying the site I noticed they have some really cool, eclectic pieces. From a Blue Lobster Print Ditty Bag . . .

. . . to this coaster:

The unifying theme is that everything is nautical.

Without even looking at their data (and based on data we’ve seen for many dozens of other sites) we know two things about user behavior:

1: When users are on your site they don’t notice 83% of what’s on the site. So most of your good stuff remains hidden.

2: There is an undeniable relationship between how much time a user spends on your site, the number of pages a user sees, and overall conversion rates. If you can get a user to spend 20% more time on your site, their conversion probability will go up. This is a fact.

So our big insight was: seabags.com has a lot of cool stuff and most new visitors will never stumble on those pages. If we could somehow get those users to stay a little longer and leisurely stroll the site (like a walk on the beach), they would notice someone they simply “have to have.”

So we took the 10% off bribe and converted it into a treasure hunt. Here is the concept:

New seabags.com popup message encourages users to explore the site. We don't give a bigger prize, we just message the prize differently.

Do you think this strategy can be applied to your site? This strategy works best for sites where there is an element of discovery. Where the user doesn’t know exactly what they’re looking for but will know it when they see it.

Our Views on Ethical Use

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Our Views on Ethical Use

Neuromarketing is powerful, which is why us marketers need to be on the right side of ethics.

It's one thing to create a strategy to slow down distracted users. It's quite another to use tactics to manipulate.

Seen the Netflix documentary Fyre Festival? That's an example of unethical marketing.

Let's use marketing for good.