Comments 23

  1. What I like most about this post is that these recommendations are highly actionable. Note that the word “Actionable” does not appear anywhere in it 🙂

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  2. Haha, I was just commenting to enforce the point of your article–how you may *think* you know what is awesome about your offering, but your audience is actually appreciating something else about it that you didn’t explicitly mention. In this case, I thought the observations and advice were actionable, as in, I actually see what steps to take to realize a benefit, which is the main reason why I liked it–but because you didn’t explicitly point this out as a value proposition in the article, its unlikely that you’d know this is why I liked it

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    Ted: I thought the observations and advice were actionable, as in, I actually see what steps to take to realize a benefit, which is the main reason why I liked it–but because you didn’t explicitly point this out as a value proposition in the article, its unlikely that you’d know this is why I liked it
    Rishi: Oh my God, so meta and so powerful. You literally are the best.

    Thanks for making my day.

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  4. You’re making a really great point here, I’m often so engrossed in our products that I can’t see the forest for the trees. However, when I actually talk to customers they remind me what’s really important. They care much less about the features (top speed, turning radius, range), which is what I tend to focus on and more about the benefits (tires don’t go flat, fits through doorways, independence). Thanks for the reminder.

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  5. Excellent article, I think my big takeaway here is to mine my reviews for looking at both the comments both the concrete and the subtext underlying those comments. I don’t think I have spent enough time on that and your reminder is very valuable to me.

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      Subtext is key. As a business owner, I know you have a whole bunch of “open items” to take care of and it can be hard to make more time for yet another thing. But I’m confident this exercise will have a big conversion boost. I’m happy to chat more, too. –Rishi

  6. Great insights Rishi!

    1. I like the idea of reading through the reviews to pull out snippets that can be used in the product description. This helps SEO also. Because you are using terms that customers are using, so it helps make your product more relevant to the searcher.

    I typically scan product reviews. So if they are really long I probably won’t read them.
    So what about taking these snippets and making them bullet points inside, or at the bottom of, the product description?

    2. I think this question is brilliant (but simple!): “What feature did you like best about your ?”
    It is an open ended question getting them to describe the benefits they received. As you mention, then the store can gain valuable insights. So much better than most review request questions I see.

    3. So implementing this method, store owners will need to go back and revisit products that have a fair number of reviews, to re-write. Sometimes we as merchants tend to set it and forget it.

    4. Your post also made me think about WHY people buy things.
    People don’t buy the Travel Pro mobility scooter (your example) because they’ve always dreamed of owning a mobility scooter, that went 4.00 mpg, or has a 17″ seat.
    They buy it to get from point a to point b. They buy it to give them freedom. They buy it to allow them to go shopping in stores. To enjoy the park, etc.

    A guy doesn’t go to the hardware store to buy a drill because it’s really cool thing to own.
    He buys a drill because he wants to drill a hole!
    He buys a hammer to pound a nail, to build something.
    Guys spend thousands of dollars on a tiny 6mm round diamond for their girl. Why? Because he wants the reaction of his girl. The oohs, ahhs, the kisses & hugs, the admiration, etc.

    I think many product descriptions could be greatly improved by using the EMOTION of the end result, the real reason for the product. Humans buy on emotion and then justify with logic and facts.

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      Hey, Ron. Wow, thanks for that super detailed comment. Absolutely love it. My numbered responses match your numbered list in the comment:

      1: You are exactly right about the positive SEO impact of mining reviews and using them to enhance product descriptions.

      2: Ron: So much better than most review request questions I see.
      Rishi: One reason customers don’t respond to review request emails is that they don’t have Likeability (which is one of the 16 conversion tactics framework I briefly mentioned on our call yesterday). And one doesn’t have to go crazy with crafting a super customized note. Just make it feel like it’s coming from a caring human.

      3: Ron: So implementing this method, store owners will need to go back and revisit products that have a fair number of reviews, to re-write. Sometimes we as merchants tend to set it and forget it.
      Rishi: And if the review counts are low you can email people who purchased the product (which is usually a bigger number than those who bought and wrote a review). And if purchase list is low set a rule on the product page so if user engages with the page and starts to exit we show a prompt that says,:

      “Hi, I’m Ron, the owner of [site]. My goal for 2018 is to make [product X] page perfect. For every visitor. You spent time on the page and I’d love to email you and ask few questions about your experience. We don’t automate anything here so if you agree to be contacted you will receive my hand-typed email. Having the opportunity to ask you a few questions via email would mean a lot and help me achieve my 2018 goal.”

      4: Ron: Guys spend thousands of dollars on a tiny 6mm round diamond for their girl. Why? Because he wants the reaction of his girl. The oohs, ahhs, the kisses & hugs, the admiration, etc.
      Rishi: You nailed it.

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  7. Excellent points throughout! It’s easy – especially when marketing a very technical product – to get stuck in the features in details. But it’s all about the customers and how the product will help them. This is one of your best articles so far, Rishi. Great insights.

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  8. Great article and advice. As a business owner, I tend to make things harder than they need to be. Rishi does a good job of helping me understand what some of my priorities should be. Lots of work, but lots of opportunities. Great to have someone like Rishi deliver these nuggets.

  9. Great job of mining the reviews to find the true selling points. I always spend a ton of time with customer reviews for my clients – it’s where I get my best copy ideas.

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