Rishi Rawat

If engaged users on your site had a chance to meet you in person how many would end up buying? No reason why your site can't do just as well.

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Comments 11

  1. You do a great job of highlighting the things that many business owners may overlook. Yes, more product will fly off the shelves. It will also find its way back to the shelf more likely.

    Question is, what will the percentage of products that get purchased from this experience? That will be the kicker for TryNow, especially if this is treated like a high-end solution. If it’s cheap to install and use, then I imagine it can be sticky and Shopify would be silly not to buy it. If it isn’t, the TryNow Team will need to quickly figure out how to make it cheap before the open source version appears.

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      I believe TryOut is in its nascency. Hard to predict if the idea will stick or not. But even if it does stick, I don’t like this trend to the bottom where retailers are eliminating *all* friction.

      Remove friction if it improves the user experience, yes. But don’t train shoppers *not to pay*. Paying with a credit card is a good signal for if the shopper is series, and if the product is worth buying.

      My fear is we’re following the silicon valley playbook where companies that have little underlying value, don’t even make money, get crazy high valuations. In the end, as with all illusions, they fail.

      I like the Basecamp.com model. Make a great product (in their case, project management software), charge a fair price, end of the story.

      Thanks for adding to the discussion, Hubert!

  2. Tell you what: Would you offer your services for $0 for a month? If the client is happy then they pay for it.
    Maybe, something like that will work, you get results the first month, no risk to a client, and you win the contract for the long term.

    But tell you what, during a global pandemic, what happens if I don’t like a product? Would, say, returning a wallet be bought by others? The one that I used and tried and didn’t like?
    What are the unit economics for such a thing? Would more people just fiddle around and not make their mind for a product purchase? Would you risk long-term impact here?

    I clearly hate this trend of deep discounting and offers, the big companies are fiddling with psychology and I don’t think in my right mind, that’ll yield good results for all.
    Think about small-time players, they don’t have deep pockets to keep going at it.

    As much as I like the concept, I think the CTR will be high. But, it’s a BIG BUT, I think long-term not a healthy move for the ecosystem.

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  3. This is an awesome idea Rishi!

    I have seen similar ideas online. I think Warby Parker has a deal where they can send out 3 eye glass frames, (not sure if they charge, or put a hold on your credit card).

    There is a jewelry website called https://www.experiencememo.com/ where they have a try it on at home deal.

    I think this is a brilliant idea!

  4. I should say this is an awesome idea for higher end products, that have low conversion rates – like expensive jewelry. Reduces fear I think. “Try it on, see if you like it, then pay us.”

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      1. I am positive there would be higher returns, for sure. But, if you don’t discount the product and high margins (such as the jewelry website referenced earlier, they are selling at full retail), then I think this is ok.

        And, at least with the high end jewelry, many of these shoppers are repeat. It is an awesome service feature that they will appreciate. It will set apart that merchant that offers this.

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  5. I think the return rates point is the big question here. On the one hand, we know shoppers already do “bracketing” and worse “wardrobing”, which–at least for stores offering free shipping and returns–accomplishes the same (or worse) result as this feature, which is basically seller-sanctioned wardrobing/bracketing. So while I was initially skeptical about the economics, looking at it that way, it might actually work, and I bet there’s a loyalty boost for customers who are not purposely abusing it.

    Also I must say great choice of example brand–the thing that would convert me is that absolutely stunning estimated delivery date section. Now that baby converts. :^)

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      Hi, Vince. I specifically picked the brand that would get your attention :). Their shipping estimate tool is beautiful.

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