Top 7 Email Signup Ideas for 2019

It’s 2019. By now, shoppers know what to expect when they’re confronted with an email signup popup.

What are shoppers likely going to do today? They’ll immediately close the popup, skip past the email signup form, or uncheck that sneaky little email newsletter box.

They do this automatically, as if they’ve been conditioned to hate popups and email signups with a passion. Well, they have been conditioned to hate them, and we as marketers are to blame.

We all show the same popups and email signups with the same generic messaging. Would you sign up for your own email newsletter? Chances are you would close out of a popup before reading the first 3 words.

But it’s not because the 10% off coupon or free item with a purchase coupons upon signing up aren’t compelling offers.

It’s because our popups and the mechanisms that trigger our email signup prompts are not compelling.

What do I mean? Below I’ll show you 7 of our favorite ideas for generating more email signups in 2019:

Idea 1: Unconventional Popup Shape

90% of the popups out there look exactly the same. They’re rectangular and feature an easy-to-spot and all-too-enticing ‘close’ button on the top right corner.

Seems like a good way to immediately tell users how to close your popup, right?

So why not try an alternative popup shape—something that will make your shopper stock for an extra second because they weren’t expecting something so different?

Look at this popup from Wayfair.com:

Instead of a rectangular popup shape, Wayfair.com uses a circle. They also removed the ‘close’ button and replaced it with a “No, thanks.” link at the bottom of the popup.

The shopper is practically forced to slow down and scan through the content. They have to do this even if they want to close out of the popup. Just by changing the shape and ‘close’ mechanism, Wayfair.com was able to slow their shoppers down and increase the chances they’ll submit their email address.

Idea 2: Use Human Nature to Your Advantage

Humans are naturally curious creatures. Someone says, “don’t go in there!” and suddenly you feel the urge to go in there. You want to know what’s there or what will happen if you go in there.

Take a look at this email signup from Trumans.com:

What’s the countdown timer for? What do they mean when they say “So close we can taste it”? Many shoppers will feel like they’ve got to know what this is all about.

But in order to know, they have to sign up.

Genius.

Idea 3: Asymmetry

Popups are often very neat. Nothing is hanging off the edge of the popup, the design is sleek, the popup is symmetrical, and so on.

However, creating a little bit of asymmetry can be all that’s necessary to slow down your shoppers and get them to read your popup content. Take a look at this example from Rockbottomgolf.com:

The Rock Bottom Golf logo is large and hanging off the edge of the popup! It looks weird, but that’s why it works. Shoppers will take notice and slow down before instinctively moving their mouse toward the ‘close’ button.

Idea 4: Let Your Shopper Play a Game

Shoppers—and people in general—love to play games. When they see a soccer ball, they have to kick it. When they see an upset bird that can be launched with a slingshot, they have to download Angry Birds on their phone.

And when they see a giant The Price Is Right style wheel . . . well . . . they can’t help but spin the heck out of it.

Elevatedfaith.com knows this. So they’re taking advantage of this in their email signup popup. Once a shopper wins a prize, they have to sign up and claim the prize within 15 minutes.

Could you resist the urge to spin the wheel?

Idea 5: Hand-drawn Popup

Take a look at this popup from Postcardmania.com:

You’re probably taking an extra few seconds to look at this popup right now. It looks fun and inviting.

More importantly, it’s unexpected. Postcardmania.com’s shoppers will definitely slow down to look at this popup. That could be enough to generate more sign ups.

Idea 6: Popup Shape that Looks Like an Object

This is taking Idea 1 above two steps further.

Take a look at this popup from 4allpromos.com:

Not only is this popup an unconventional shape, it’s a dang truck! This will certainly be unexpected and slow down more shoppers.

Idea 7: Can You Keep a Secret?

You probably want to know what the secret is, right?

Like I said earlier, people are naturally curious. UncommonGoods.com knows this and they’ve taken advantage of this with their email signup.

Take a look at this floating tab that appears on their site:

Many shoppers will definitely want to know what the secret is, so they’ll click on this floating tab. When they do, they’ll see this:

UncommonGoods.com is making their shoppers feel exclusive. After all, only people who subscribe will be notified of “secret sales”. Do you think all shoppers would be able to resist the urge to find out what secret sales they could benefit from?

What do your email signup popups and prompts look like? Could you be taking advantage of any of these ideas?

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