If You Want Feedback Remove All Friction

Received this great email from Lyft asking why I hadn’t used the service in a while. See screenshot and notes below screenshot:

Lyft_Survey.png

Love this email for 4 critically important reasons:

1: It’s personalized to my actual behavior (“why have you not used Lyft since 6/14.”)

2: Headline makes it clear this is a quick email (“One-Minute Feedback”).

3: I just have to click one link to submit my response.

4: Lyft doesn’t send a ton of emails so I noticed this message.

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Why Curiosity Matters

Bob Moesta is a curious person. He was involved in home building and selling condos. His condos were designed based on the stated needs of their target audience (ranch style, 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, granite countertops, hardwood floor, etc.) But still, a big percentage of interested people didn’t pull the trigger.

Bob wanted to understand why.

He discovered people who were moving into this condo were moving from bigger homes and were anxious about the downsizing process. They simply didn’t know how to pack up 20 to 30 years of stuff that had been collected. Important, nostalgic stuff. They didn’t know how to purge collected memories. So people would say things like, “Boy, we don’t know how we’re going to downsize. We’ll need to cancel on the condo because we need another year to figure out how to downsize”.

Here is what Bob did: he raised the price of the condo and included (in price of condo) moving plus 2 years of storage. Result? Sales went up 17%.

Be more like Bob when thinking about your ecommerce business.

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Navigation Speed

Shoppers who navigate your site at a fast pace are fundamentally different from leisurely movers. Do you treat these 2 groups differently? You should.

Fast browsers are typically in pre-research or post-research pre-commit mode. This means they either have just started their shopping journey or are at the end of it and have a shortlist of options but want to make sure they are making an informed decision. If you have prominent advertisements for things like “Download Buyer’s Guide” or “Schedule an In-person Consultation” and they are being ignored it’s because when shoppers are in pre-research or post-research pre-commit mindset they don’t want to engage with options that are time-consuming.

To serve these people create quick consumption content that doesn’t doesn’t add to mental load but powerfully communicates why YOU are the best option.


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Every Last Drop of Efficiency Matters

I was signing into LinkedIn and noticed a nice little improvement. Moment I got to @ I was shown a dropdown of popular email services. It might just shave off 1 second of typing time, but every second counts:

LI_Login.PNG

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Reducing Terms and Conditions Friction

Most sites have a checkbox for Terms and Conditions:

checkbox-required.png

This increases friction because the user has to take an action (clicking the checkbox).

On Indeed.com the message just states that if the main action button on the page is clicked (in this case Send) user is automatically accepting terms:

Indeed- Privacy Policy, Terms of Service.png

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Difficult Choices Kill Conversion Rates

We think choices are good, but if you don’t clearly describe the differences between choices you are most definitely hurting conversion rates. Consider this: A shopper is looking to buy a wireless temperature sensor for their grill. They land on https://store.weber.com/accessories/category/igrill-products/1640 product page:

weber_product_page

The item sounds impressive and within their price range. But now the shopper notices a second option called iGrill® mini and it’s priced lower:

Weber_Mini.png

The shopper is viewing this page on their mobile phone (small screen) and they’re switching back and forth between the 2 options to understand why the mini is cheaper. They like the lower price but a voice in their head says, “what’s the catch here?”

And unless they clearly understand why the mini is cheaper they aren’t going to buy.

It turns out that the difference between the 2 models are the number of probes you get. But in the 10 minutes I was playing on these 2 product pages I simply couldn’t figure it out.

I’m not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but neither are many of your potential customers. You aren’t designing experiences for the smartest shoppers, you’re designing them for average, easily distracted shoppers.

Here is an idea: add a piece of code so that if a shopper first visits iGRILL® 2 page and then goes to iGrill® mini, on mini page we add new bolded content under product description that says:

The difference between iGRILL® 2 and iGrill® mini is that with iGrill® mini you get just 1 probe slot and with iGRILL® 2 you get 2 probe slots.

This would make my choice clear.

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Guiding Through a Complex Purchase

Buying a large banner print online can be overwhelming: what if you screw up the order? Signsite.com has developed a clever solution. When you first visit a product page (for example http://www.signsite.com/hanging-banners) what would normally look like …

Signsite.com_Product_Page

… transforms to this–

Signsite.com_Overlay1

And when you click Next the next tip appears:

Signsite.com_Overlay2

Click Next one more time:

Signsite.com_Overlay3

Click Next one last time:

Signsite.com_Overlay4

What I love about this tactic is that it accomplishes 2 goals:

1: Teaches the shopper how to fill in the required info.

2: Ensures shopper sees the customer service number so they can call if they still have questions.

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But Why?

I visited etienneaigner.com and saw this popup (below).  I have just 1 question:

Etienneaigner_com_But_Why

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Credit Card Field

For any ecommerce store capturing the credit card number is the most important step.  Therefore, it makes sense to have the most user-friendly credit card capture interface.  And Google has nailed this.

When you first click on their credit card box they show payment icons in the background of the text box.  Like this–

G_CC

Then when you type the first digit of credit card they recognize the card type.  For example, if your first digit is 4 you have a VISA–

G_VISA

If your first digit is 5 you have a MasterCard–

G_MasterCard

This is an example of Trust.

Also, as you type your credit card number they add an extra space after every 4 digits to make it more readable (it also matches the way the numbers look on your physical card)–

G_Digits

What’s really crazy is that they seem to have some sort of real-time card validation going on because entering the fake 5555 5555 5555 5555 number threw up the red border error message. I have no idea how that’s done–

G_Error_Message

Anyway, the point is that this degree of attention to detail is what separates the champions from the rest.

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