Selling Premium Items on Amazon.com

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I was looking for a digital air pressure gauge, so I did a search on Amazon:


Amazon optimizes for reviews and the cheapest prices, meaning the two metrics they look at to determine the search results ranking are number of quality reviews and product price. After I did my search, the first product that showed up was this item with a 4.5-star rating and $9.38 price:


The product I decided to look at, however, was lower on the page. It was this Craftsman product:


This Craftsman product has a good number of reviews (345) but a price of $19.97, which is why it is ranked lower on the results page. If I’m Craftsman, what am I to do to get more clicks on my product? Lower my price to become more competitive? ABSOLUTELY NOT. There is always room for premium products, so don’t feel pressured into reducing your price.

Let’s first think about the mindset of a person (me, for example) who would click on the $19.97 Craftsman air pressure gauge instead of the first result—the $9.38 AstroAI air pressure gauge:

1: I thought to myself that the first result looked kind of cheap.

2: I want an air pressure gauge that will last for years, so is $19.97 really that big of an investment? The $9.38 option may break within a year and I’ll need to buy another. That cost adds up.

3: Most importantly, when I have low pressure, do I really want to compromise on a low quality product or would I rather pay a few extra dollars to ensure I’m getting a more accurate reading? After all, as many people say, “you get what you pay for.” So I’m assuming the $19.97 product is more accurate, made of better materials, more reliable, and more durable.

Those are the reasons I looked at the Craftsman product instead.

Craftsman knows that their product is ranked lower on the page. Despite that knowledge, their product description is pretty generic:


If Craftsman knows that their potential customers have seen cheaper alternatives, why aren’t they using that knowledge to their advantage in their product description (Serendipity tactic)? Here’s a new version of their product description:


Here’s the copy:

Imagine you’re in the situation where you need to check your tire pressure. You want to know you’re getting an accurate reading, right?

The wrong reading can result in poor fuel efficiency & unsafe driving conditions, which costs you more in the future.

Craftsman’s Programmable Digital Tire Gauge isn’t your cheaply-made, unreliable tire gauge. Instead, this gauge is made of top-quality materials, making it reliable, durable, and—most importantly—accurate.

The programmable digital tire gauge can be set with the target tire pressure for your specific vehicle and is designed to be easy to use. Just push in the nozzle to read, and the Air Bleed function will measure for exact pressure. A beep tells you when the gauge has locked in the pressure reading and you can take it out. The extra large backlight display is suitable for use at night, and it even handily converts to a white LED flashlight.

Which product description do you think is more effective? The current one or the new one?

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